27 10 2014
studio-nucleo_Jade_AP1_2_new
"Shouldn't I be aware of what this object is, I would think of a candy, one of those you immediately want to crunch and give you immediately the fresh taste of peppermint, the strong and intense taste of aromatic herbs or the one of a mouthwash." Luca Trevisani #NucleoCandy

Has the mouthwash a good taste? What do you mean?

3 years

Nucleo creates tactile visions

3 years

Or maybe when u crush it , you would release the brown monster trapped/frozen inside since prehestoric ages

3 years

Using chemical processes to recreate nature

3 years

mouthwash but also bling bling

3 years

I’m talking about a strong taste

3 years

aptic

3 years

an object is a living thing, a character.. animali domestici.. don’t u know ?

3 years

luca and pier shuld do a performance about ancestral fluxus

3 years

please guys reply its urgent

3 years

dont be shy

3 years

luca is a voice obsessed with flowing of things

3 years

stop real life in an image

3 years

Luca sorry it’s seems we are stuck in a cloud

3 years

Anti technological flow !

3 years

from tge colour and texture it looks like candy…but with the sharp edges and shape it looks like a non eatable synthetic material

3 years

this object is confusing for me

3 years

functionality helps

3 years

pier: my objects are not so easy to relate with

3 years

you cannot easily put plates or glasses on my tables

3 years

Enter

About

“Syn” comes from the Greek “With, Together”.

This is exactly how we approached the work of Studio Nucleo: in conversation with a group of likeminded people, rather than in solitary discourse. The material we produced discussing together was generated through a series of talks involving a number of multidisciplinary personalities and the students of a leading design school, Domus Academy.

During these talks, the work of Nucleo has been ‘augmented’ by being ‘attacked’ from all angles. What has been put together – a blog, and shortly, a book (CENTOMILAANNI) – has become a ‘symptom’, a talisman of a quality and of an obsession.

Reactions by

Italo Rota

Recorded on the 7th of March 2014, at Domus Academy, in Milan. Italo Rota begins by reacting to Nucleo Design speaking about luxury.


"The price is one of the most important things when it comes to collecting. $1,000,000.00 is not a large price to pay for something labeled as ‘Art’. It all depends on one considers ‘Art’. It can change from person to person.”


“Art can become history, and having a piece of history in your collection is something that can be described as priceless.”


“Throughout history and in every period there have always been luxury goods, whether they are for royalty, religious leaders, or simply the wealthy class. They appreciate surrounding themselves with things that society deems of high value. In the next few years highbrow and lowbrow cultures will overlap blurring the lines between markets even more. This will result in more unique segments, segments that will be pursued directly or indirectly by artists.”


Caroline Corbetta

Recorded on the 7th of March 2014, at Domus Academy, in Milan. Caroline Corbetta begins by reacting to Nucleo Design speaking about the difference between art and design.


“Art and design are very different. A designed object have a practical function, while an art-piece has no practical function. This is my very basic distinction. Nucleo’s work is a hybrid of the two categories. Nucleo works as an artist while at the same time functions as a designer. Pierre Robino is allowed to express himself just like an artist. But artists and designers share the fact that they both have to meet certain requests and work within client based restrictions. Everyone thinks that artist are completely free to do whatever they want, but that is not the case. Designers tend to work on the answers/solutions while artists work on the questions.”


“There is a difference between the pleasure of the artist/designer and that of the collector. The artist/designer’s pleasure creates the value of the art-piece in the world, while the pleasure of the buyer creates the economic value that is set. There are two kinds of pleasure and not always they do match each other.”

Matthew Claudel

Recorded on the 29th of March 2014, at the Institut Culturel Italien, in Paris. Matthew Claudel reacts to Nucleo Design.


“A few impressions. I think I can catalogue them into words. The first being ‘chemistry’. I think your work becomes a kind of chemistry on a lot of levels. It seems like we are talking about the process of the workshop, but an other a kind of chemistry is a reaction between people. I think your flirtation with the unexpected is a really exciting part of that. So you articulate a sort of process, a chemical reaction. You put in materials and then you let it lay out and it becomes something.”


“I also wanted to bring up the word ‘preservation’. I think that all of your work actually speaks to preservation. Sometimes quite literally like the bench in the resin. But also the preservation of ideas. You were saying that the motivation behind that one is specifically to not lose a process, so like the mosquito in amber, rather than DNA that is being preserved, it is a sort of abstract knowledge of your manual process. So I really like your idea and what becomes interesting about the materiality you choose is that it’s a transparent enchasing material that can house the object being preserved. But it’s not a new material, it’s not like you created a museum box that exists only to be transparent, it actually engages in a dialogue with the object itself. The cracks in and the bubbles are actually an expression of the relationship between things. So my third word is ‘dialogue’ or ‘relationship.’”

Federico Nicolao

Recorded on the 29th of March 2014, at the Institut Culturel Italien, in Paris. Federico Nicolao reacts to the unusual functionality of Nucleo Design.


“One of the things that impressed me is the fact that all your works create a relationship and a dialogue with what surrounds them. Usually design creates a dialogue with what is around it, but its a functional dialogue. Here this dialogue and invention is not so much functional, but it is more intuitive, and subtle, it is made of an aesthetic value that really struck me.”

Marco Rainò

Recorded on the 22nd of May 2014, at Domus Academy, in Milan. Eva Fabris reacts to Nucleo’s Petrogliph Chair.


[about Nucleo's Petrogliph chair - the chair keeps the words “Can beauty save the world?” hidden in its structure]


“The way you show a piece is telling a lot about your expectations from the public. In the case of Petrogliph chair, it seems you didn’t want to charge the public with the heavy burden of a concept. You let them free, and your art has this other layer of interpretation only to be put in for people interested in buying or really willing to learn more.”

Andrea Bellini

Recorded on the 30th of April 2014, at the Centre d'Art Contemporain, in Geneve. Andrea Bellini reacts to Nucleo Design comparing Pierre Robino and Ötzi.


“I said that Pierre Robino’s face reminds me of Ötzi, the guy that was found frozen in the Alps. The Iceman was found with all his tools. I think that in a certain sense, they found him working with stones and playing with materials.”


“In the past, at the very beginning, people were using copper to create functional things; guns, wheels. Then they started using the exact same materials to make art, sculptures and figurative sculpture, and so on.”


“Pierre, with Nucleo, is conducting a research on the materials and then he is creating new materials. As a result of his design background, he is making new objects that can be used or not.”


“I think he himself is not really a designer, because in the end he’s not interested in the shape of the object. He’s almost a scientist, an alchemist, and the problem is not that he doesn’t want to be seen, or he doesn’t see himself as a designer: he is simply another kind of entity.”


Massimo Torrigiani

Recorded on the 22nd of May 2014, at Domus Academy, in Milan. Massimo Torrigiani reacts to Nucleo design speaking about the intention of the artist.


[About Nucleo's Petrogliph chair - the chair keeps the words “Can beauty save the world?” hidden in its structure].


“On the one hand, it’s very important to understand the intention of the artist, on the other hand to consider how the work is perceived. Pierre said that some people look at his chair and say – ‘It’s beautiful, I want it.’ - but they don’t necessarily know anything about the intention of Pierre or the process and words which are hidden into this chair. Someone might even be willing to pay the amount Nucleo is asking for, without knowing the story behind. But when you know the story you like it even more, and it becomes even more valuable. This said, it is also very important to consider the intention of the artist almost as an accident. In the process there are things that not even the artist can control, and one of the reasons why art is interesting is because things happen in the process which is not controlled by anybody.”

Eva Fabris

Recorded on the 22nd of May 2014, at Domus Academy, in Milan. Eva Fabris reacts to Nucleo’s Petrogliph Chair.


[about Nucleo's Petrogliph chair - the chair keeps the words “Can beauty save the world?” hidden in its structure]


“The way you show a piece is telling a lot about your expectations from the public. In the case of Petrogliph chair, it seems you didn’t want to charge the public with the heavy burden of a concept. You let them free, and your art has this other layer of interpretation only to be put in for people interested in buying or really willing to learn more.”

Agenda

Credits

CENTOMILAANNI

CURATED BY
Gianluigi Ricuperati / IPW

ACTIVATED AND DESIGNED BY
Actant Visuelle

ORGANIZATION
Erika Rozzo

WEB DEVELOPER
Filipe Pereira (@fil090302)

SUBJECT
Nucleo Design Studio

TEACHERS DOMUS ACADEMY
Anthony Louis Marasco
Francesca Vargiu
Nima Gazestani
Francesco Sorrentino

COSPIRATORS
Italo Rota
Caroline Corbetta
Mathieu Claudel
Federico Nicolao
Andrea Bellini
Marco Rainò
Valentina Ciuffi
Massimo Torrigiani
Eva Fabris

STUDENTS DOMUS ACADEMY
Kristina Prybula
Debby Putri Febriana
Farida El Benhawy

Contact

For any question or if you want to feed, with your thoughts and questions, also the page on the left, write to: info@centomila-anni.it